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  #1  
Old 08-28-2010, 07:46 PM
rexlapin rexlapin is offline
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Default Axon Sequencer?

I have been interested in the new Audio Damage Axon Sequencer:
(http://www.analogindustries.com/ has some programming tutorials)
and was wondering if something like that could be built with the
modules in Numerology. I would prefer not having to buy yet another
bit of software if what I have already will do the trick and most likely
expand on the concept!
Cheers,
Scott
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  #2  
Old 08-29-2010, 02:06 PM
jim jim is offline
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Numerology doesn't have a proper 'counter' module, so it can't do exactly the same thing, but I was able to build something very similar.

From what I can tell, Axon works by creating a set of summed values from a small set of counters, then triggering a note when a sum reaches a certain value. You get to control which counters contribute to a sum, and what the counter limit is.

For this Numerology example, I've setup 4 gate sequencers to work both as counters (via their Step Num outputs) and as gate generators (to trigger notes). The sequencers are setup such that all of them generate a steady stream of triggers, but each sequencer is a different length. They are grouped into four pairs (1 & 2, 2 & 3, 3 & 4, 4 & 1), and the Step Number values of each pair are summed together. Then, for each pair, the sum value is compared to some integer (called the 'seed'), where the comparison can be any of 6 standard numeric comparisons, less than, less than or equal, not equal, equal, etc.. The result of that is then used to turn on or off the output of one of the GateSeqs into a NoteGenerator.

The result is that by tweaking the seed value, and the comparison operation, you can get a wide range of rhythmic patterns. You can further expand the options by tweaking the length, rate and step values of each GateSeq.

Cheers,
Jim
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File Type: zip CombinatorialPerc.zip (318.2 KB, 46 views)
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  #3  
Old 08-29-2010, 03:49 PM
rexlapin rexlapin is offline
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Wow, thanks Jim! That was quick work, and even if I don't understand exactly everything you said in your post, I'm sure that playing with this will give me plenty of new ideas. I keep finding that buying Numerology was one of the smartest moves I ever made!
Cheers,
Scott
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  #4  
Old 08-29-2010, 06:26 PM
jim jim is offline
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Groovy, thanks! There'll be a lot more of that kind of stuff coming w/ the 'factory' stack library as part of the final release...

Cheers,
Jim
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  #5  
Old 08-30-2010, 09:04 AM
rexlapin rexlapin is offline
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I had lots of fun last night trying this out. I substituted Urs' Bazille modular synth
for the drum module and added an Interval sequencer (one driving all of the Note
Generators). This would be really slick with macros to contain the various submodules
as I ended up doing a lot of scrolling to repatch! ;-)
Thanks again for your excellent customer support and responsiveness to our requests.
Cheers,
Scott

Last edited by rexlapin; 08-30-2010 at 09:07 AM.
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  #6  
Old 08-31-2010, 10:47 AM
jim jim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rexlapin View Post
This would be really slick with macros to contain the various submodules as I ended up doing a lot of scrolling to repatch! ;-)
I agree, but there are also some simple things I can do to make it easier to manage, such as adding a MIDI Filter at the end to make it easy to patch in a different synth....

Cheers,
Jim
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  #7  
Old 08-31-2010, 11:15 AM
rexlapin rexlapin is offline
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Thanks Jim, that would be helpful as well. I really like the idea of the
macro level building blocks as I've indicated in another thread, and
look forward to seeing how Numerology will "evolve".
Cheers,
Scott
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  #8  
Old 08-31-2010, 09:09 PM
newgreyarea newgreyarea is offline
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Yeah, I have no idea what this is doing but I like it! A lot!!
More please! Or point me to a place to learn how to used some of these advanced parts of Numerology.
-b
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  #9  
Old 09-02-2010, 12:40 PM
theau theau is offline
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I wish I will understand this stack. It is far more complexe then what I use...
Thanks Jim, the results are really interesting but not usable for me till I understand what's going on !

Bisous !
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  #10  
Old 09-03-2010, 11:40 AM
jim jim is offline
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I've attached a simplified version. It removes the Faderbox and the ParamMods, which are just used to create a centralized control panel, and drops all but one of the 'voices'. I also slowed the rate of the sequencers down to one quarter note at a time.

There are two sequenced input values to the "algorithm" : the summed step numbers of the two GateSeqs, and the actual triggers from the second GateSeq. The summed step numbers are processed a bit, and then used to control an 'on/off' switch that "gates the gate values" before they reach the NoteGen. More on that in a bit, first back to the summed step numbers:

The step number output of a GateSeq that is 4 steps long produces a repeating sequence like this:

0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, 2, 3, ...

Each value refers to the current step number of the sequence in a zero-based format (i.e. step 1 is '0', step 2 is '1', etc). When you take two sequencers of different lengths and add them together, as the first BinaryOp module does, then you get a more complex but still repeating sequence. For instance, if one seq is 3 steps and the other is 5 (as is the case here), you get:

0, 2, 4, 3, 5, 2, 1, 3, 5, 4, 1, 3, 2, 4, 6, <then repeat>

Changing the length of either GateSeq will change this sequence of numbers. Lengths that are relatively prime (3 and 5, 5 and 7, etc) will produce more complex sequences than lengths that have common divisors (2 and 4, 3 and 6, etc). So what we have is a way to produce a series of small whole numbers that isn't random, but is a bit more complex that what you might come up with on your own. And you can modify them with two simple controls, the lengths of each sequence.

Next the second BinaryOp module takes this sequence of numbers and converts them to a binary sequence of 0s and 1s, which looks like this:

0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, ...

It does this by comparing it to some other number, preferably a whole number that is also contained in the source sequence, such as anything between 0 and 6. The comparison operator can be any of the usual numeric comparisons (<, <=, !=, etc), with the result being 0 where the comparison is false, and 1 when the comparison is true. If the comparison is "equals 4", then the output will only be 1 when the input is 4, resulting in a sparse note pattern. If the comparison is, say, < 5, which most values are, then the pattern will be more dense.

Finally, the 0s and 1s output from BinaryOp-2 is used by the TernaryConditional to 'gate' the trigger sequence coming from one of the GateSeqs (it doesn't really matter which, since both GateSeqs are set to output a steady series of quarter note triggers). Think of the TernaryConditional, when setup as it is here, as a CV mute switch: When its input is 0, it mutes the series of triggers, when its input is 1, it lets the triggers through. Finally, these triggers are then used to drive the NoteGen.

So from a small set of simple controls: The lengths of the two GateSeqs, and the choice of comparison operator and value used in BinaryOp-2, we have created a pattern that is musically useful, and has a surprisingly complex relationship to its inputs. This means that you can't exactly determine what the generated output will be, but you can influence it towards a certain direction. If you in the mood to create a deterministic manner, where you know what you want, then this is not the process you want to use. If, on the other hand, you want something aleatoric, where you do not direct control, but want to influence the process, then this type of algorithm can be a great idea generator.

More on aleatoric music here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleatoric_music

Cheers,
Jim
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File Type: zip CombinatorialPercOneVoice.zip (298.6 KB, 26 views)
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